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Decolonizing Anthropology: Comprehensive Exam Practice

Describe what is meant when anthropology is labeled “colonial.” Anthropology has aided colonization by dehumanizing and stereotyping Natives, by causing an erasure of Native history and identity, by helping the colonial authorities manage native peoples, and by appropriating Native culture and knowledge. This essay will serve as a definition of the colonial effects of anthropology

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Foundations of American Ethnography of the Northwest Coast: Comprehensive Exam Practice

Area 2: Ethnographic Accounts of Pacific Northwest Native peoples   This subject entails the discourse and dialogue between Native peoples and societies and ethnographers on the Pacific Northwest Coast. What is intrinsically part of the discussion is an analysis of the history and progress of ethnography, and of the interactions between ethnographers and Native peoples.

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A Stable Kalapuyan Anthropogenic-Environmental Model?

It is noted that humans have had an extreme effect on the environment everywhere they have lived. These changes became much more radical some 12,000 years ago when agriculture was developed. In the Willamette Valley the tribes did not develop agriculture. They did instead participate in seasonal anthropogenic fires, and seasonal harvesting of foods, at

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Origins of the Willamette Valley Treaty Map of 1851

Leonard White was a steamboat captain that began his career in early Oregon at Salem. White was born in Indiana in 1827 and came to Oregon Territory in 1843 with his father James and mother. They took a 640 acre donation land claim in West Salem, Polk County in 1845.  Leonard White married Gertrude Hall

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Chemeketa Creek Becomes Mill Creek

A creek in Salem, Oregon, presently named Mill Creek (GNIS 1163145), was named such in the 1850’s. To aid the flow of the original creek, that had been called Chemeketa Creek, a millrace was constructed between the Santiam River, down Mill Creek and into Pringle Creek to provide power to the Salem Woolen Mill. The

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