Category: Rogue Valley

Indian Catchers of Coastal Oregon 1850s

A truly remarkable fact of Oregon history presented itself while conducting some coastal research. In 1856 and for years after, the Indian agents employed and contracted with enterprising individuals to seek out and capture Indians still remaining in the lands or escaped from the reservations, and return them. The image recalled when hearing about this

Continue reading

Medicinal Plants of the Rogue Rivers at Grand Ronde, 1858

When the tribes got to the reservation in 1856, the federal Indian agents were then 100% responsible for feeding them and caring for their health needs. I have documented in numerous essays that the federal government was slow to appropriate funds for the reservation, even when they had treaties, and that hunger and starvation was

Continue reading

A Hot Bed of Disease and Death, Anson G. Henry Physician at Grand Ronde

In 1857, Doctor Anson G. Henry wrote a report on the health conditions at Grand Ronde. A few days before he had written another report, a table of the disease and death counts for the reservation for the past three months, (October-December 1856). His account is perhaps the most detailed of the health reports of

Continue reading

The Gateway on the Central Oregon Coast, Fort Umpqua and the Umpqua Sub Indian Agency

  The southern and central Coast of Oregon is a relatively unknown area in Native American history. As the area is not well researched it is generally assumed to have been vacated during the Indian removals of 1856. However, federal records show us that this is not the case at all. That there were tribes

Continue reading

War on the Umpqua Tribes and Removal to the Umpqua Reserves

Much has been written and published of the Rogue River, Modoc, and Yakima Wars in the Oregon Territory. These wars were, by-and-large, reactions of the tribes to extreme attacks on their land, and their survival.  There are number of other such conflicts that did not reach the status of war for historians. In the Umpqua

Continue reading