Category: Oregon Coast

Lt. William A. Slacum, United States Spy in the Oregon Territory, & Chief Slacum of the Clowewalla

Lt. William A. Slacum, a Navy purser, was sent by the President, through the Department of State, as a special investigator to the Oregon Territory to investigate the Britain operations and to take stock of the tribes and the resources in the territory. Slacum was alone, except for one servant, and was not sent with

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Bison of the Western Rockies

  For years, I have stated that the tribes did not have bison in Oregon, so they would not have made tipis. This is why the tribes have plankhouses and longhouses made from woven mats. Tipis require a large animal to cover the tipi with their hides. This has made sense to most people. We

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Ethnography of Oregon Indians 1841: Horatio Hale of the U.S. Exploring Expedition

Horatio Hale’s created what may be one of the earliest ethnographies of the tribes of the Pacific Coast. Remarkable as it is, Hale’s ethnography is both interesting and disappointing. Much of his analysis of the Native peoples of Oregon shows his western bias and he does not hide it at all in his analysis. A

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Oregon Native Place Names in the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Part 2

The next section map of the coastline, (770c) begins with Cascade Head and ends at the Cape Meares. Every major feature of the Coast has a Native name. It is likely that some of these native names are preserved on earlier maps. It is also likely that Native peoples on the coast were consulted about

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Contributions of William and Almira Raymond to Native Administration in Oregon

William Raymond was a sub-Indian agent from 1851 until at least 1857. He administered the tribes first at the Astoria sub-agency, then later moved the agency to Tillamook. In 1856-1857 he was at the Grand Ronde Indian Reservation. Raymond and his wife Almira were among the members of the Great Reinforcement, a contingent of largely

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