Oregon Native Place Names in the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Part 2

The next section map of the coastline, (770c) begins with Cascade Head and ends at the Cape Meares. Every major feature of the Coast has a Native name. It is likely that some of these native names are preserved on earlier maps. It is also likely that Native peoples on the coast were consulted about the names of various features. The remaining villages in this area was a small settlement of Native peoples at Nehalem (Tillamook) and the people collected at the Salmon River Encampment. Many of the people at the encampment were from the northern coast, yet nearly all of these people would have known the names due to habitual travel and trade between villages. The following descriptions begin in the south and move northward, following the progression of Davidson’s book.   Cascade Head is Nastucco Davidson writes, At this ninety-two feet point there is a small stream breaking through a sharp valley directly upon the sea, and a

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Contributions of William and Almira Raymond to Native Administration in Oregon

William Raymond was a sub-Indian agent from 1851 until at least 1857. He administered the tribes first at the Astoria sub-agency, then later moved the agency to Tillamook. In 1856-1857 he was at the Grand Ronde Indian Reservation. Raymond and his wife Almira were among the members of the Great Reinforcement, a contingent of largely religious missionaries attracted to Oregon by Methodist minister Jason Lee, to aid in the conversion of the Indians from savagery to Christianity. They arrived in June 1840 on the steamer Lausanne, from New York, stopping at Hawaii and landing at Fort Vancouver. The Raymonds were first stationed at the Methodist Mission at Chemeketa Plains. In 1842 they moved to Wascopam at the Dalles, then back to Chemeketa, and then in 1846 to the Clatsop Plains and a bit later to Tansey point where the Raymonds took up a landclaim and farming. William became fluent in the Chinook Wawa language and in 1851 helped with the

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