Tag: Kalapuya

Lost Horses & Rights of Native Peoples in Salem, Oregon 1875

In 1875 a good number of letters were sent around to Indian agents about Indians who had “illegally” left the reservations and who were living in a settler community, about small minor crimes and disturbances by Indians from the Dalles to Roseburg. During this time the federal government was in the midst of taking several

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Related To Old Man Fisherman, a Family of Yoncalla Indians

The Fisherman family of Calapooia Indians are related to the Halo/Fearn family in ways that are as yet unclear to people not from their community. The Heirship record (20294-12) for the family reported on for the Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs, by March 9, 1915, raises interesting issues of relatedness of the

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Henry B. Nichols recalls the Calapooians, 1903

Henry Brainard Nichols, was a school teacher and state legislator from Benton County, Oregon. He was born 1821 in Lyme, Connecticut, and attended Wesleyan University at Middletown. In 1847 he started for Oregon, arrived in 1852, and settled in Benton County. He began teaching in the Belknap Settlement and took 319.75 acres as a donation

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Treaty with the Umpqua and Kalapuya, Negotiated November 29, 1854, Ratified March 3, 1855

On November 29th 1854, the tribes of the upper Umpqua River (Umpqua) and Yoncalla Kalapuyans signed a treaty with the United States for their lands.  This was the second treaty for the area north of the Umpqua Range. These tribes were then removed to the Umpqua Reservation. They had already had a lot of interaction

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The Willamette Valley Treaty (Treaty with the Kalapuya, Etc.) Signed January 22 & Ratified March 3, 1855

The Willamette Valley Treaty was designed to remove the tribes from western Oregon, from lands desired by American settlers. When the treaty was finally signed, on January 22th, at Dayton, Oregon, at Joel Palmer’s DLC homestead (Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon). The tribes were ready to sign, to be removed from the vicinity of

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