Tag: Kalapuya

Bison of the Western Rockies

  For years, I have stated that the tribes did not have bison in Oregon, so they would not have made tipis. This is why the tribes have plankhouses and longhouses made from woven mats. Tipis require a large animal to cover the tipi with their hides. This has made sense to most people. We

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Ethnography of Oregon Indians 1841: Horatio Hale of the U.S. Exploring Expedition

Horatio Hale’s created what may be one of the earliest ethnographies of the tribes of the Pacific Coast. Remarkable as it is, Hale’s ethnography is both interesting and disappointing. Much of his analysis of the Native peoples of Oregon shows his western bias and he does not hide it at all in his analysis. A

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A Stable Kalapuyan Anthropogenic-Environmental Model?

It is noted that humans have had an extreme effect on the environment everywhere they have lived. These changes became much more radical some 12,000 years ago when agriculture was developed. In the Willamette Valley the tribes did not develop agriculture. They did instead participate in seasonal anthropogenic fires, and seasonal harvesting of foods, at

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Lost Horses & Rights of Native Peoples in Salem, Oregon 1875

In 1875 a good number of letters were sent around to Indian agents about Indians who had “illegally” left the reservations and who were living in a settler community, about small minor crimes and disturbances by Indians from the Dalles to Roseburg. During this time the federal government was in the midst of taking several

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Related To Old Man Fisherman, a Family of Yoncalla Indians

The Fisherman family of Calapooia Indians are related to the Halo/Fearn family in ways that are as yet unclear to people not from their community. The Heirship record (20294-12) for the family reported on for the Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs, by March 9, 1915, raises interesting issues of relatedness of the

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