Soc-te-la Chief of the Luckimute Kalapuya People

The following section of a letter to General Joel Palmer details that at least one chief Soc-te-la knew they were to remove and was working to gather his people in preparation for such a move. It is unclear from the letter which tribe Soc-te-la belongs to and the letter mentions the Umpqua and Siletz rivers. … More Soc-te-la Chief of the Luckimute Kalapuya People

The Significance of Salmon River Encampment in 1875

In 1875, the United States Congress passed an act, March 3, 1875, to reduce the Coast Reservation. This act, terminated the Alsea Reservation, that section on the south, and opened that section to white settlement. The previous act in 1865 (President Andrew Johnson signing the Executive Order of December 21, 1865) had eliminated a section … More The Significance of Salmon River Encampment in 1875

Indian Catchers of Coastal Oregon 1850s

A truly remarkable fact of Oregon history presented itself while conducting some coastal research. In 1856 and for years after, the Indian agents employed and contracted with enterprising individuals to seek out and capture Indians still remaining in the lands or escaped from the reservations, and return them. The image recalled when hearing about this … More Indian Catchers of Coastal Oregon 1850s

We Are Willing to Remove Anywhere, Where We Can Obtain Peace: Removal of the Rogue River Tribes To the Grand Ronde Reservation

The second large removal of the Tribes to the Grand Ronde Indian Reservation took place between February 23rd and March 25th in 1856. (The first large removal was the Tribes of the Umpqua Reservation, in the previous month.) Previous to the removal of the Rogue River tribes, there was quite a bit of angst from … More We Are Willing to Remove Anywhere, Where We Can Obtain Peace: Removal of the Rogue River Tribes To the Grand Ronde Reservation