The Original 1855 Belden Map, Compared to the Redrafted Version

In 1855, the United States was on a campaign to purchase all of the land from the Oregon Tribes and remove them to reservations. Joel Palmer, Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon, was working hard to make all arrangements for the removal of the tribes. In January of 1855, he met with the Kalapuya, Molalla … More The Original 1855 Belden Map, Compared to the Redrafted Version

Alexander Phimister Proctor in Oregon

Alexander Phimister Proctor (1860-1950), is born in Canada and becomes one of the most famed American sculptors of his time. He worked extensively in the American West and especially in Oregon. He studied in France under the Master Sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens, and thereafter sought to exemplify the traditional philosophy of his teacher of Simplicity, Nobility, … More Alexander Phimister Proctor in Oregon

Gifts for the Chiefs: Visitations to the Superintendent’s Office in Dayton

After the tribes were removed to the reservations and the treaties were ratified payments began to the chiefs. The tribal chiefs would get the annual payment to their tribes and would be responsible for doling out the money and supplies to their people. For some 20 years this was the pattern for leadership at the … More Gifts for the Chiefs: Visitations to the Superintendent’s Office in Dayton

This Place is as My Heart: The 1855 Wasco-Deschutes Treaty

In 1855, Joel Palmer met with the Wasco and Deschutes tribes to convince them to sign the treaty and remove to the proposed Warm Springs Reservation. The chief of the tribes spoke powerfully about their love of their land, calling their fish, gathering and hunting places  like the parts of their heart. The tribes knew … More This Place is as My Heart: The 1855 Wasco-Deschutes Treaty

I Have Only One Talk: The Dog Rivers Refuse to Remove

At the June 1855 treaty meeting of the Deschutes, Wascoes, and Walla Wallas, there were also the Dog River Cascades. They are listed on the transcript as being there but apparently never spoke publicly at the gathering. Various letters by Palmer and others suggest that they remained on their lands for several years beyond the … More I Have Only One Talk: The Dog Rivers Refuse to Remove