Red Caps Murder Patora

In March 1855, Patora a chief of the Yurok tribe was murdered by volunteers on the Klamath River in California. The Yurok at this time were peaceful and trusted the military and distrusted a band of volunteers called the Red Caps. The Military under Capt. Judah was organizing to arrest the Red Caps with the … More Red Caps Murder Patora

Causes of the 1853 Rogue River War

The first Rogue River War was a series of skirmishes and battles between mainly gold miners and the tribes. The miners had no regard for the tribes and tended to treat them badly. Some miners, the worst of the bunch, would murder native men on sight and take native women to rape them. It’s very … More Causes of the 1853 Rogue River War

The Battle of Abiqua, Second Battle of the Willamette Valley

The Battle of Abiqua In February 1848, six months after the Whitman Massacre, the settlers in the Willamette valley were very tense, concerned that the tribes would gather together and attack.  Many of the men had volunteered for a militia and were in eastern Oregon for the Cayuse War, so additional citizen militia were established … More The Battle of Abiqua, Second Battle of the Willamette Valley

Fighting from the Corner: Reports of Invasion of Rogue River Country

The Rogue River War – a series of conflicts between a confederation of tribes – loosely around the Rogue River Valley- and the American Ranger Militias and United States Army, is addressed historically (by many) as a single war. However, the Rogue River area had two periods of war separated by barely a year of … More Fighting from the Corner: Reports of Invasion of Rogue River Country

Priming the Powderkeg: Table Rock area in 1855

In 1853 there had occurred the Rogue River War. That war was likely caused by continued encroachment into tribal lands by settlers, and the failure of the federal government to ratify the first Oregon treaties. Joel Palmer arrives at work in 1853 and immediately begins in southern Oregon because of the active war happening there … More Priming the Powderkeg: Table Rock area in 1855