Klickitat Bands Colonize the Columbia River and Northwestern Oregon

The Klickitat (Klikitat, Clickitat) tribal nation are for many people in Oregon, synonymous with “Oregon Indians.” In fact, Oregon still has stories of Klickitat trails, and a Klickitat Mountain in the Coast Range. Yet, the Klickitats are not originally from Oregon at all. Their habitations in the 19th century were the eastern flanks of the northern Cascades, that section of the range north of the Columbia River. The Clickatats claim a district of country north of the Columbia, but they are a roving tribe and are scattered about in different parts of the territory. Their number is four hundred and ninety-two. (Anson Dart Letter of September 1851, RG75, M2, R11)  Scholars have theorized that the Klickitat, much like the Molallas, were driven west in the recent past to settle in the northern Cascades. There, they became renowned for elk hunting, and as mounted infantry. They were feared by area tribes and ranged in their travels into Oregon, as far south

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Trade Between the Interior and the Coast; Kalapuyans, Klikitats, Coosans

Previous to the Americans and the British In Oregon, the tribes had numerous interrelationships with one another. Trade was a major part of the lives of all tribes. Some tribes had vast resources, but only in a few items were they specialized. The Chinookans, had vast amounts of dried salmon because of owning the best salmon fishing sites on the Columbia and Willamette rivers, as well as access to all of the trade items in the Columbia River Trading region, a vast trade zone which stretched from the mid-west American plains to the Pacific Coast. While the Kalapuyans had lots of camas and wapato from the fertile inland valleys, they also could access the Columbia river trade when they visited the Clackamas villages at Willamette Falls. The Klickitat were elk hunters and they specialized in elk hide products. The Coastal tribes had vast amounts of ocean products, especially shells, which could be turned into sharp tools, or jewelry. For many

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A Startling History of the Cascades Indians, 1855-1862

On March 26, 1856, a year after the Willamette Valley treaty is negotiated (Jan. 22, 1855) there is an uprising on the Columbia near the Cascades. There are numerous versions of the story,  but it is associated  as an extension of the Yakima Indian Wars, where  Klickitat and Yakima and perhaps some Cascades Indians were upset with the Americans and killed some of them in a series of attacks on settlements and outposts on the Columbia River. The Yakima leader Kamiakin was upset about the invasion of his country and wanted to drive the Americans from the Columbia. The Klickitats were upset because they had not gotten a treaty for their lands, and many of the Klickitats felt that their recent occupation of the Columbia and apparent conquest of the the Willamette Valley meant they deserved a treaty. This situation was created after epidemics wiped out a good portion of the Indian in the region. From 1829 to the mid-1840s

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